Stop a Bleed

Basic first aid procedures apply to people with hemophilia and inhibitors, just like everyone else. Bleeds in patients with inhibitors should always be treated under the guidance of your doctor, nurse, or hemophilia care team.3,11

RICE (rest, ice, compression, and elevation) is an important treatment strategy to remember when it comes to managing muscle and joint bleeds. It can help the bleeding stop faster. It may also reduce the amount of clotting factor needed.4,7

The injury must be completely rested. Ice limits the damage and reduces swelling. Compression limits the swelling and may lead to a quicker recovery. Raise the injured area to limit the amount of blood going into the area, prop it up with a few pillows. Elevating will also help to reduce swelling.
Rest. Give the injury time to completely heal.
Ice. Ice reduces pain and swelling. It also limits damage from the bleed.

The best method is to crush ice in a damp towel and place this over the injured area for 10 to 15 minutes. Cold packs and ice packs can be useful. Do not put ice directly onto your skin. If you don't have anything else handy, wrap a bag of frozen vegetables or some ice cubes in a towel and apply it to the area. Ice should be applied for 20 minutes, every four to six hours, until swelling and pain decrease.
Compression. Bleeding from cuts will stop more quickly if direct pressure is applied. Compression limits the swelling and may lead to a quicker recovery. Compression may be gentle pressure on the injury, or light bandaging.
Elevation. Raise the injured area to limit the amount of blood going into the area (prop it up with a few pillows). Elevating will also help reduce swelling.

Additionally, using splints, pillows, slings, and crutches to stop the joint or muscle from being able to move for a short period of time can aid healing and help decrease pain.

Take Care to Avoid

Bleeds can be painful. But, in managing that pain, it is extremely important to avoid taking any aspirin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) — like ibuprofen — or any medications containing ASA (acetylsalicylic acid) while bleeding occurs. Such pain medications might cause bleeding to last longer, so they are best avoided.11,13,15

Talk to your doctor, nurse, or hemophilia care team if you feel pain in your joints.3